Thursday, July 28, 2011

Grumble

Decided not to ride the bike today. Can't really lift either. Ribs feel better but still hurt from crash the other day. Supposed to be training for Pennsic (though since I can ride 32 miles in a day right now, I don't think my wind is a problem for Pennsic). But no training today.

It gives me a bit of time to talk philosophy. I never try to hide the fact that my main goal in fighting is to win my second crown. I've done some stupid things in that pursuit, like going to a bunny round for three years, but I still think I've got a shot. While spring crown wasn't too good, with sword and shield since I went to the 24x36 heater I am fighting great. Pennsic will be a real test. I've also given notice at Paragon which will free up a lot more Saturdays. So here is the philosophy part.

We fight for ourselves. We fight for our consorts. We fight for our kings. A lot of people try to say that you shouldn't want to win, or that you should fight for the pure joy off fighting or to make you consort happy or to support your king, but that fighting to win is bad. I fight to win. I have enjoyed fights I've lost, but I usually enjoy winning more. People also say you shouldn't want the crown. That's bull. Why would you fight for something if you didn't want it? I realize there are a lot of reasons to fight in crown that have nothing to do with reigning, and people who have little chance of winning still fight. And they should--I've got that old school Western attitude that Crown is what this game is all about and so everybody should fight in crown. But for me, if I didn't want to win I would feel bad about fighting. I've struggled with this the last few times I've fought in Western crown. Do I really want to try to be king of the West while living in the East. I can afford the travel, that's not the issue. I've got the savings and would spend it happily. So far, every year, the answer has been yes. I still love the West, I'm still active there, and I'd enjoy being king. If ever I felt that I couldn't do it, or that I didn't want it, I'd stop fighting in June Crown. But the alrger point is that I want to be king.

Shouldn't people want to be king if they are fighting in crown? And, in a larger sense, shouldn't people want to be king or queen period, since that is the foundation of our game?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

That is the whole point of the game... as a matter o'fact, it's part of what we swear to do upon entrance into the Royal List or has that changed.

If you don't wish to be King, don't enter the Royal Lists; fight in the melees, fight in 'Roses' or help with the bys.

'Sides, your 'belled mug' needs another Royal workout. ;) Go for it!

Da Squirrel

stag said...

You fight to win....with honour.

If you have an off day you still have an awesome experience. Almost always for me, the experience trumps the win. But its nice to win.

The ones who go boo hoo because they don't win the big prize fail to realize that there is no way to lose in this sport. Fighting is like drinking...and you cannot lose a drinking contest.

But many will think I am justifying failure, somehow making the best of it even if I came in second. Crappola....there can not BE any failure when one fights an honourable and clean fight. Oh wait...there CAN be a failure...and that is when you do something dishonourable to get the "win".

Maybe its all in how you define "victory".

Ze'ev Felsen said...

I think you know that there are plenty of good reasons to not want to be king or queen. My lady for example would be bored to tears by court, and as such has no desire to reign.

I think ultimately, it depends on why you want to win crown. There are good and bad reasons to want to be king/queen and I think we can all imagine plenty of either. In an SCA context, I was raised on the philosophical writings of Countess AElfaed of Duckford.

MAC said...

AElfead is one of the more thoughtful philosophers. Though I don't always agree with her I think hers us a sound philosophy to follow. I was raised in the philosophical tradition of William the Lucky, the old Western tradition, which places a premium on Crown as the raison d'etre of the SCA. --Valgard